shanty boat pontoons made of trash

by Robert Wildwood

Here is the link to my book: “Unsinkalbe: How To Build Plywood Pontoons &
Longtail Boat Motors Out Of Scrap”
http://www.microcosmdistribution.com/catalog/books/3679/

Front of pontoon and Lord Gedly guarding the perimeter.

Angled front part of a pontoon and Lord Gedly guarding the perimeter.

Here we are working on the pontoons for the shanty boat. So far all material is from the trash (except screws and glue). The sections assembled will make a pontoon boat 10 feet wide and 24 feet long, each one stuffed with buckets, bottles, foam, and anything else that will cause bouyancy. All of which is free. Below is a picture of my flatbed bicycle cart loaded with foam found in the trash. You hardly need a few bills in your pocket to go down the river.

The Bicycle Flat Bed Trailer. It can haul full sheets of plywood and create an instant parade in the street.

The Bicycle Flat Bed Trailer. It can haul full sheets of plywood and create an instant parade in the street.

Below is a shot of the assembly of the middle of a pontoon. The sections will be attached with bolts, then stuffed with stuff that floats, and capped on the top with plywood. The two pontoons will be attached to each other with 2×4’s, bolted into the pontoons with lag bolts.

The pipe clamps make it easy to pre-drill and screw the pieces of the pontoon together. The crew also builds the boat, we know every detail down to the last splinter, and on the water she'll sing a music to our ears.

The crew also builds the boat. We know every detail down to the last splinter, and on the water she'll sing a sweet song that we all know.

We decided, on this day, to call our boat “The Snowball”.

One pontoon ready for the river.

One pontoon ready for the river.

Next to the pontoon a 17' long Herters Wilderness Canoe with square stern for a motor to be attached. The pieces of the second pontoon we built when we got to our launching point in Kansas City. Visible in the pontoon here are 5 gallon grease jugs from a fast food restaurant.

Next to the pontoon a 17' long Herters Wilderness Canoe with square stern for a motor to be attached. The pieces of the second pontoon we built when we got to our launching point in Kansas City. Visible in the pontoon here are 5 gallon grease jugs from a fast food restaurant.

Somewhere out in the Mississippi basin. Our shanty boat, "The Snowball" and my Herters Wilderness Canoe, "The Saucer". At the end of a day of boating, the sun going down, relaxing.

Somewhere out in the Mississippi basin. Our shanty boat, "The Snowball" and my Herters Wilderness Canoe, "The Saucer". At the end of a day of boating, the sun going down, relaxing.

The Snowball tied up to a lazy bank, the front of the boat pointed upstream, tiny ripples of current heading down.

The Snowball tied up to a lazy bank, the front of the boat pointed upstream, tiny ripples of current heading down.